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Reports

Biologic and Biosimilar Medicines 2020

Report on the impact of pharmaceutical innovation

The 2015 Intergenerational Report (IGR)

The 2015 Intergenerational Report (IGR) will help guide Government policy and focus public debate on the sustainability of its major spending programs. A critical assessment of previous reports’ projections for the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS), together with the most recently available independent data and projections will help to inform the community of the long term sustainability of the PBS.

Medicines Australia Annual Reports

The Impact of Further PBS Reform

This new report by the Centre for Strategic Economic Studies (CSES) at Victoria University evaluates the impact of Further PBS Reforms set out in the Memorandum of Understanding between Medicines Australia and the Commonwealth Government agreed in May 2010. In reviewing the effect of the 2010 reforms, the report also provides an update on the savings arising from 2007 PBS reform. The report estimates the influence of the 2010 pricing reforms on key contributors and beneficiaries in the future.

The Impact of Further PBS Reform pdf_icon 527k (May 2013)

Survey of Research Governance Timelines in Australia

Despite ongoing reforms, the time it takes to start a clinical trial in Australia is not getting shorter, and sponsors are increasingly citing the lengthening research governance approval timelines as the cause of the problem. In November 2012, the Pharmaceuticals Industry Council’s Research and Development Taskforce (RDTF) conducted a survey to collect data on the efficiency of research governance processes in Australia. The results show that, on average, research governance reviews add 49 calendar days to study start up in Australia. In 2011, the Clinical Trials Action Group, which was set up by the Australian Government to help improve Australia’s competitiveness as destination for global clinical trials investment, recommended a combined 30-day best practice benchmark for both ethics and research governance reviews.

Survey of Research Governance Timelines in Australia pdf_icon 224k (April 2013)

Facing the Health of Australians

Facing the Health of Australians reveals the views, attitudes and perceptions Australians have about their own current health status and that of their families as well, and highlights areas of concern. Expert commentary throughout reveals how we’re dealing with these concerns and hopes for the future.

Facing the Health of Australians pdf_icon 4,355k (March 2013)

Survey of Industry Sponsored Clinical Research in Australia

The Clinical Trials Action Group was set up by the Australian Government in October 2009 to ensure Australia maintains its international competitiveness in clinical trials and to secure continued investment in the sector. In its final report, the Action Group made 11 recommendations, aimed at improving patient recruitment and making the process of initiating new clinical trials significantly more efficient. It also sought metrics to be collated on the value and performance of Australian clinical trials with previous estimates suggesting that companies spend around $450 million on conducting clinical trials in Australia each year. As the data in this report shows, private investment is significantly higher than previously thought. In fact, this survey gives the most accurate picture yet of the nature and economic importance of private investment in medical research in Australia.

Survey of Industry Sponsored Clinical Research in Australia pdf_icon 533k (October 2012)

Medicines Milestones – A decade of persistence, prevention and promise

In the ten years to 2011, some 795 medicines were approved for use in Australia. These medicines are extending life expectancy, improving quality of life, and even preventing some diseases altogether.

The Medicines Milestones report, commissioned by The Australian Medicines Industry and carried out by research firm Pretium, found that treatments were approved for a total of 93 different conditions. These ranged from common conditions such as asthma and hypertension, to the very rare, such as Niemann-Pick disease Type C.

The report found that treatments for cancer, cardiovascular diseases and vaccines led approvals in Australia over the last decade.

Cancer treatments accounted for 115 of total approvals, reflecting the burden of the disease (one in two Australians can expect to be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lives1). The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) also approved 82 medicines for cardiovascular disease, a leading cause of death in Australia.

Prevention of disease also featured prominently with 57 new vaccine approvals. Vaccines that became available in the past 10 years include childhood vaccines on the National Immunisation Program such as measles, mumps, rubella, polio, diphtheria and whooping cough. Others included meningococcal and meningococcal meningitis, cervical cancer, influenza, tetanus, smallpox and cholera.

Most of the Federal Government’s National Health Priority Areas were strongly represented, with 184 TGA approvals, led by cancer control with 56 new approvals in identified focus areas, arthritis and musculoskeletal conditions (53), cardiovascular health (29) and diabetes (27). However, when it came to depression, there were just six approvals for new medicines within the mental health National Health Priority area over the last decade.

Medicines Milestones – A decade of persistence, prevention and promise pdf_icon 4,777k (August 2012)

A comparative analysis of the role and impact of Health Technology Assessment

Over the last ten years, Health Technology Assessment (HTA) has become an increasingly important part of the assessment system for new medicines. It is generally agreed that HTA has the potential to assist payers in making informed decisions about allocating resources (including expenditure on medicines) in the health system. However, it is also possible that a poorly designed or managed HTA process runs the risk of denying patients appropriate access to medical technologies, inefficiently allocating resources, constraining clinical freedom and sending distorted signals to medical technology providers.

To this end a considerable amount of effort has been put into developing best practice principles which demonstrate a degree of consensus between academia, payers and industry. Charles River Associates (“CRA”) was asked by EFPIA, PhRMA, Medicines Australia and EuropaBio to undertake a comparative assessment of the role and impact of Health Technology Assessment (HTA) in different parts of the world. In this report, we use these principles to compare how different systems use HTA, the basis of the approach they apply, how it works in practice and the consequences for the key stakeholders.

A comparative analysis of the role and impact of Health Technology Assessment

This report presents the fourth annual set of outcomes resulting from a collaborative project between Medicines Australia, the Department of Health and Ageing and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC) to jointly develop indicators that can be used to monitor the listing proces ses as they apply to the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) and National Immunisation Program (NIP). The primary purpose of these indicators is to facilitate the identification of trends in the process of adding items to the PBS/NIP that may provide the basis for further dialogue.

A comparative analysis of the role and impact of Health Technology Assessment pdf_icon  5,021k (May 2011)

PBS Activity – Graphs

This report presents the third annual set of outcomes resulting from a collaborative project between Medicines Australia, the Department of Health and Ageing and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC) to jointly develop indicators that can be used to monitor the listing processes of the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS).

The primary purpose of these indicators is to facilitate the identification of trends in the process of adding items to the PBS that may provide the basis for further dialogue.

PBS Activity – Graphs pdf_icon 37k

The Impact of PBS Reforms on PBS Expenditure and Savings

This new report by the Centre for Strategic Economic Studies (CSES) at Victoria University examines the impact of PBS reform measures since their implementation. CSES was commissioned by Medicines Australia to analyse trends in overall PBS expenditure and to report on how recent reforms have affected stakeholders, namely, Government, pharmacists, wholesalers, manufacturers and patients. The report also models the potential impact of the PBS price disclosure mechanism. The findings were reviewed favourably by Access Economics.

The Impact of PBS Reforms on PBS Expenditure and Savings pdf_icon 1043k (December 2009)

AMWG interim report to the Minister for Health and Ageing

A report form the joint Medicines Australia / Deprtment of Health and Ageing. The Access to Medicines Working Group.

AMWG interim report to the Minister for Health and Ageing pdf_icon 464k (July 2008)